MUSINGS OF A LIGHT SKINNED AFRICAN.

Meeting people and having light conversations with them is what I do every now and then because of the nature of my job. Whilst doing this, I realized that I actually do love talking to people. But asides from my distinctive accent, my skin color has become a thing of debate. Most people ask questions about my skin based on curiosity and sometimes concern/love and I am always willing to answer it but sometimes these questions become overbearing and come across as a subtle shade, I still take it as love and not the other way round.

Ever since I have known myself, I have always been light-skinned. This question has been asked every time I meet people for the first time because they are curious. The many questions made me ask my parents about my skin colour differing from theirs and I was able to know that my paternal great grandmother was light skinned and my maternal grandfather was light skinned, so my parents obviously had the light-skinned genes recessive in their DNA which later became dominant in me (biology will explain this a 100%). Just so you know the third generation kids in my Dads family are light skinned.

Why are you light  skinned? Are you sure you aren’t using lightening cream? Are your parents light skinned?

I think I have been able to explain this a 100% percent above. No, my parents are not light skinned and I am not necessarily using any lightening or whitening cream to get lighter or light skinned

You are getting lighter are you sure you are not bleaching?

This became a major question earlier this year and I had to explain to everyone who used to know me that asked this question. It is the cold season and I have to dress in layers to keep myself warm. I have little or no exposure to the sun this season hence a clearer skin. And sometimes picture filters does the magic.

Black is the real definition of beauty. You are not beautiful because you are light-skinned.

I personally feel this is a very wrong statement to say to anyone. No matter how much self-esteem the person in question might have if you continually say this you will break the person down gradually and make the person feel less beautiful or appreciated. No matter what your definition of beauty is, don’t try to rub it on someone who obviously can’t change nothing about there appearance; keep it to yourself and MOVE ON. Someone actually said this to me when I was in high school and this broke me but I was able to rise above it.

How come you are light-skinned and African? Are you mixed or something?

Again my parents are African, so I am purely African. I am not mixed or half-caste. And I have explained this above.

And the list goes on…

Not everyone who is light-skinned is using skin whitening products. Let’s rule out this misconception, some Africans are naturally light skinned.

So this is me trying to share what it feels like to be light skinned and African. Though these questions differ amongst individuals, it for sure is definitely similar.

Tutu geh 1

Can you relate to this post? Do you have similar experience (s)? Or am I taking this too far? Let’s discuss in the comment section.

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22 | NIGERIAN LIVING IN DIASPORA | SHARING BITS AND PIECES OF MY WORLD

2 thoughts on “MUSINGS OF A LIGHT SKINNED AFRICAN.

  1. Well I can relate with you shared because of all my siblings I am the most light skinned…mum is light skinned, dad issa a dark skinned man. I’ve got a very sensitive face so if I stay off the sun with a continuous use of my Sher butter my face especially becomes fairer and as such people begin to assume am using a lightening cream when am actually using my Òrí of #100 which could last me for a month. But I’ve learnt not to allow what people say get to me. But really, those folks asking you these questions need to come down to Nigeria and see our almost white skinned beautiful Igbo ladies.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I just found another #teamlightskinafrican 🖑. Doing the right thing and basic facial care makes the face glow and lighter, but most people don’t know this. Thanks for stopping by the blog and also dropping your thoughts on the post. I really appreciate it and I hope you come by again.

      Like

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